Fascia Treatments for EDS and Fibromyalgia 


Editor’s Note: This article was updated and checked for accuracy on 4/16/19. Thank you.


I’ve been doing a new home therapy designed to break down and allow new healthy fascia to form and I’m happy to report I’m more than impressed with the results. I have seen a great deal of relief from symptoms that stem from my Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome as well as my Fibromyalgia and POTS. I would recommend this treatment for anyone looking for relief and/or improvement in any of the following categories:

FasciaBlasting Improvements

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The above lists are all improvements I personally experienced within the first 6 months of blasting and continue to enjoy so long as I keep up my practice semi-regularly. It seems amazing, but the restoration of nerve and blood flow to the extremities through fasciablasting can trigger major changes in our physiology.

What is Fascia?

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Fascia is a type of fibrous connective tissue that is dense and firm. It lays beneath the skin, binds the muscle together into bundles and connects it with other connective tissue such as tendons and ligaments, and wraps the organs. In essence, it is the glue that holds the soft tissue of our bodies together and connects it to our bones. In Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Fibromyalgia, fascia is often dysfunctional, overgrowing and at the same time constricting the muscle. Often, it begins to strangle the muscle and nerve fibers within, causing oxygen deprivation and poor circulation, and an inability for the muscle to function properly. The muscle begins to malfunction in this restrictive cage. Literally starved for energy, the muscle atrophies and begins to spasm and twitch. Soon, even the gentlest of pressure becomes unbearable.

When those constricting cages of fascia are connected to joints, they can pull on tendons and ligaments, impeding the proper function of the joint itself. This increases instability of the joint, greatly increasing the changes of a subluxation or dislocation of the joint along with a possible tear.

For fibromyalgia sufferers, this study suggests a strong connection between fascia and the neurological problems associated with Fibromyalgia: Fascial Plasticity – A New Neurobiological Explanation. Dr. Schierling, a leading expert in the study and treatment of fascia through chiropracty shares this philosophy and does an exceptional job of discussing the issues of fascia and chronic pain syndromes. I highly recommend this article to expand your understanding of this topic. Sine it’s so well covered, I won’t be taking a lot of time to discuss it here, but I do strongly encourage interested parties to take a deep dive into Schierling’s work, as he is simply brilliant and you will learn a great deal from him.

Why Fascia Therapy Helps

Fascia therapy seeks to break down this overgrowth of fascia, freeing up the muscles and allowing them and all corresponding connective and nerve tissue to heal and function properly. Once the muscles are freed from this constricting cage, muscle pain is eased, nerves heal and begin to receive signals properly, corresponding connective tissue and joints function properly, restoring balance and coordination. According to a recent article put out by Dr. Schierling, fascia itself is actually partly responsible for proprioception, so healthy fascia is especially important in this aspect.

A Proven Device Used for Fascia Therapy

The device I use was recommended by another woman with EDS in a holistic EDS treatment group I belong to and those of us in the group who have been doing these treatments religiously have all reported positive strides in our progress.

Trials were recently completed on the device and while the full findings have yet to be published, some preliminary findings have been released. The article provides some great details about how it changes the biology and aids the body after just 90 days of use. It can be found here. This section of Black’s Blog provides a detailed accounting of the many ways fascia work is known to effect the body.

The device, called a FasciaBlaster, is marketed primarily to rid yourself of cellulite and let me tell you, it works for that, but what it does for chronic pain and the other symptoms above is what it is truly treasured for by most users I come across. Of course it’s claims that it wipes out cellulite are also valid. That’s because cellulite is created by dysfunctional fascia and if you have EDS, you may have more than your fair share, like me. The dimples and lumps that make up cellulite are the skin being pulled unnaturally by these bundles of fascia, almost like stitches gathered in cloth.

Of course cellulite isn’t the reason I’m using it, but it’s a nice bonus. Another bonus is that you can actually sculpt your body with it by targeting specific areas and utilizing the fat lysing technique (contracting the muscles during treatments), once your fascia have been properly prepped after several blasting sessions. The inventor, a sports medicine guru named Ashley Black has videos that will show you how if you’re interested. Be aware that this will NOT break up fascia, as the muscles must be relaxed during treatment for the effective breakdown of fascia and of course this is what will give you the most needed health benefits. Still, if you seek to lose weight and are having the same difficulties I am, you may want to consider adding fat lysing to your therapy once your fascia are in decent shape. I myself have just begun these treatments and they’re going quite well.

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The Mini2, shown above is just one of a few versions of the FasciaBlasting devices that Ashley Black has created. At this point, she’s come out with so many, that I decided to put together this buying guide which explains what each model is best used for so you can get those that suit your purposes best.

What’s Next?

If you’re new to blasting, see my FasciaBlaster Buying Guide before making your first blaster purchase. Then be sure to check out my 23 Tips for FasciaBlasting specifically for spoonies to make sure you’re getitng the most of your new tool.

Also be sure to take a look at the other posts I’ve made about FasciaBlasting:

Fascia Treatments for EDS and Fibromyalgia
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13 thoughts on “Fascia Treatments for EDS and Fibromyalgia 

  1. Thank you very much for sharing. I feel so much more informed🧩 and ready to now start dealing! I will be here often! God bless🙏

  2. I have battled Fibro since 1999 with little success when it comes to long term effective treatment. I’ll have to look into this. Thank you for helping to raise awareness about this.

  3. Very good blog post, extremely informative.
    Thank you so much for sharing. We never realize how others lives are affected by chronic illness.
    I love your site.

    1. Thanks so much, Barb. It means so much to hear this from a people like you, whose work I admire and respect so much. I learn so many things from your site as well. It’s hard sometimes, focusing in on our conditions as we do, but so necessary for education and awareness. It’s my experience that though we have different conditions, we have so much to teach each other. I wish everyone understood that value so clearly for their own sake. Xx

  4. Just out of interest, do you have fibromyalgia or are you just a paid advertising lackey for Ashley>

    1. I’m not the “paid lackey” of anyone. I have diagnoses of EDS and fibromyalgia. I write about things that help my condition in order to help others who also have these conditions. I do not accept any free products or get paid for anything I write.

  5. I think I may have stumbled onto something. The chick who created MELT has created a device called the Fascia-Releazer. It’s expensive and sold in Germany, but it relies on stroking the fascia with vibration. The science looks good (http://www.fascia-releazer.com/science/)
    I’m having a hard time breaking through my bound fascia to get any blood flow. I’ve just added Ashley’s fascia pulling and I think I’m going to try adding vibration into my routine. Start with heat->fascia-pulling->oil->vibration->FasciaBlaster. And see what happens.

    1. Hi Cyrilla. Interesting find! Can I ask how long you’ve been working with the FB and what areas you’re having difficulty getting blood flow in? Often, especially if you have EDS, it can take several treatments to get the fascia open enough to get good and red, which indicates positive blood flow. At first, skin coloring may not change at all, then will mottle or become splotchy during treatments, then finally the whole area will turn bright, blushing red. If you’ve been doing the treatments consistently in the same area for longer than a couple of months, I’d definitely consult the videos and tutorials and even #askashley if you’re still not seeing these blood flow indicators.

  6. I am so excited that you are of the same mind — it seems to me that, in particular, the EDS Lipodema people are suffering from messed up Fascia – the fascia is preventing the waste products to be eliminated from the body, and end up being stored as fat. The fascia tangles the nerves, causing pain in the “fat”, and the cold fat is caused by blood flow not being able to get to the surface of the skin.

    In addition, I’m of the mind those EDSers who have persistent bruises that take a long time to resolve are also having issues with fascia, and the movement of the blood out of that area.

    Those who are looking for myofacial release – are they also at the mercy of their fascia? Their muscles are “trapped” by the fascia? And their nerves are tangled in the fascia??

    I really think so. In addition to my FasciaBlaster treatments, I’m also having Medi-cupping done — that pulls a vacuum on the skin, theoretically also returning blood to the surface/ and separating the fascia layer. (My alternative to having someone else Fascia Blast while I’m still “weak”)

    Thanks so much for such an in-depth article — I had watched many Fascia Blaster videos, but did not know of the links for the 29 zones or the full body workout.

    1. Cheryl, thanks for taking the time to comment! I do think fascia is part of the problem in some types of EDS and an inability to get myofascial release compounds many EDS related symptoms. I also think it puts a great deal more strain on our already loose tendons, increasing injuries, pain and comorbid conditions. Having treatments done is a great way to get started! I know little about medi-cupping, but I found their website in case people want to explore the option; http://medicupping.com/. My understanding is that there may also be treatments available in sports medicine, so that may also be something for people to explore with their doctors.

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