Easy Book Clip Spares Hand Pain

One of the things I like to do when I’m lying about licking my wounds is to immerse myself in some good fiction to try to dull the pain and discomfort of my symptoms. If the brain fog’s not so bad, I’ll go for a book in favor of TV or movies. I am, after all, a literary creature first and foremost. It’s all a matter of whether I can concentrate and retain what I’ve read. Laying here trying to read this gorgeous piece of prosaic beauty from Alice Walker (and failing miserably)…

_The Temple of My Familiar_ by Alice Walker

…it occurred to me that I should be working on reviewing one of the many handy gadgets I’ve found for my fine spoonie and zebra pals, instead. You can actually see it attached to this book with the little butterfly on it, the Easy Book Clip.

I sometimes forget that brain fog works much like exercise. Just like the body, it can still operate, it just needs a lightened, modified workload when chronic illness flares. Just because I can’t do the mostly technical, highly specific sort of the medical article I was working on when this flare hit doesn’t mean I can’t write at all. It’s the perfect time to return to lighter pieces such as these where I don’t have to try to translate technical jargon into layman’s terms or keep track of 5 different resources and 30 facts about mast cells or mitochondria. This is part of how I have always balanced blogging and brain fog.

The Easy Book Clip

So today I get to return to the easy and comfortable topic of mobility devices! Though I’ve been looking for something that would hold open my books for me for a long time, it took me a while to find the Easy Book Clip. That’s unfortunate, because I hear a lot of buzz about these things in the spoonie/zebra communities and someone could be making a small fortune from them.

I searched Amazon several times, to no avail. Finally, I must have hit on the right terms, as the Easy Book Clip showed up in a Google search. At the bargain rate of $14 USD for 2 (one with this darling butterfly design that reminds me both of fibromyalgia and POTS, the other unadorned), I had to try them out. I’m so glad I did.

They not only hold the book open when laying flat, but let you prop them up on a table so you can read while eating or doing something crafty with your hands. I can’t, but I’ve seen many a woman knit or crochet and read simultaneously.

Free-standing book on table, held upright by Easy Book Clip

Of course for us zebras and spoonies, not having to hold our books open means relief from hand pain. Our nerves, which get entrapped in our overly taut fascia can cause terrible hand pain that makes even the slightest touch torture. Some of us have multiple joints in our hands and fingers that are subjected to constant subluxations and dislocations or that are riddled with arthritis, terribly inflamed and stiff. Whatever the case, the pressure of holding open a book is more than most of us can bear for more than 5 minutes let alone 55 minutes and we often have a lot of down time to fill.

The Easy Book Clip has made a big difference for me. I no longer have to put my book down or switch hands frequently to massage and stretch them or worry about numbness creeping up my arms. While I still often grip the book to hold it at the perfect level for my frequently changing vision, I can keep my hands completely relaxed.

It’s easy to turn the page and make adjustments, too. I was worried about this at first, but it’s really not a problem. They’re also of good quality and seem like they’ll last a good long time, while they’re thin enough that they don’t damage the book or make the spine sit too awkwardly when closed into a book.

The Easy Book Clip may not help with the brain fog, but hand pain is definitely no longer on the list of deterrents from this favorite of pastimes. I highly recommend getting a device like it if you like to read and suffer with hand pain of any kind, including trigger finger or carpal tunnel syndrome. I especially like this one, since it can be used completely hands free.

This is not a paid review. I purchased this item with my own money and chose to share it with my readers simply because I like it. If you know someone who could benefit, please share it with them!

 

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7 thoughts on “Easy Book Clip Spares Hand Pain

    1. I do too. I’ve always been a bit of a bibliophile. I love the tactile and olfactory experience of a real book, but did eventually cave and start buying ebooks to save on space and expenses, but glare sensitivity made me kick that. I’m sometimes forced to listen to audio books because my vision is sometimes a mess or my migraines are too much for even paper books, but it beats twirling our thumbs when we have the energy/ability for nothing else, right? šŸ˜

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  1. Looks good too! Just a note that I recently got a Kindle and was pretty impressed by how much more I could actually read. The light weight, width, fonts, etc helped a lot, especially with the issue you mention šŸ™‚ I know it may not be your thing, but just thought Iā€™d share! šŸ™‚

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    1. Sheryl, I had a paperweight at one point and I’m a wee bit sorry I got rid of it because it *may* have been low light enough that it never would have aggravated my migraines, but I went through a period where I was unable to read for longer than 10 or 15 minutes for maybe two years and sold it when things were really desperate. I love real books so much, I’ve just stuck with buying from HPB clearance sales since and reading audio books when I’m having difficulty seeing. But it is a goid option, so long as glare sensitivity isn’t too much of a problem and you use a kindle paperwhite or good blue light filter!

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      1. Ahh I see! Really sucks when you can’t do something you love and that’ll distract you due to chronic issues šŸ˜¦ The smell of real books is definitely unbeatable šŸ™‚ And yes, I have a paperwhite and blue filter glasses…hopefully that helps a little as I spend way too much time on digital devices, I admit šŸ˜”

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